Five Life Lessons from Twitch Plays Pokémon

Playing Twitch Plays Pokémon isn’t exactly fun. It’s exasperating. It’s boring. It’s spectacularly repetitive. Participating for a few days – or even a few minutes – is enough to make you want to punch a Caterpie. That’s because in Twitch Plays Pokémon, simple tasks become grueling challenges. You know exactly what to do, but still you go backwards. You walk in circles. You get stuck – sometimes for days. Thousands of people worked in unison to play Twitch Plays Pokémon, which let viewers participate in a game of Pokémon Red – the original role-playing classic for Nintendo’s Game Boy –

Twitch Plays Pokemon

Nintendo Should…

Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or have real things to worry about) you know that the venerable game maker Nintendo has been having trouble making money lately. Now, I’m not a financial analyst. And I’m not really an expert on the Japanese game development or hardware business either. In fact, I’m not even that huge of a Nintendo fan any more. I kinda don’t like those Super Mario Galaxy games. BUT! I did beat Super Mario Brothers 3 back in the day (and I have a column due) so I’m pretty sure that makes me qualified to opine

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My Party (Kit), My Rules

Rules are meant to be read, not followed – or so the mentality goes. That’s where I invariably step in. Silent limitations are given a voice. Chaos is contained. Rebellion is met with a metal cage. Passes at “imagination” to save one’s skin are denied. And decisions only have finality after being scanned for correctness, like a manic security drone equipped to stun threats without hesitation.

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Anywhere But E3

Michael Westgarth blames E3 for spoiling his day, but only because he’s jealous.

Anger Management

Asura’s Wrath hates everyone and everything. This is a very good thing.

Mommy, Why are All the Bad Guys Russian?

An appreciation of Russian villainy.

Tetris: The Soviet Union’s Sleeper Agent

The Cold War may be over, but Jill Scharr knows that the threat of communism lingers on thanks to the insidious Soviet mind game Tetris.

My Dad the Sportsballer

Dennis Scimeca shares a revelation about his dad that changed the way he views the term, “gamer.”